Fish and Wildlife Foundation of Florida
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Category: Species Spotlight

Our Resources pages are dedicated to providing key information on a host of iconic Florida species and habitats, as well as on nature-related issues confronting our State.

Species Spotlight: Florida Panther

Donate The puma once had the largest range of any land mammal in the Americas. The species was well adapted to a variety of habitats from forests to deserts, mountains to rainforests. Today, pumas are found in only half of their historic range, primarily in the mountain and desert regions of the western United States. […]

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Southeastern American Kestrel

Species Spotlight: Southeastern American Kestrel

The Southeastern American kestrel is the smallest falcon found in the United States. It has a brownish back area with black markings and a white belly, and black marks extending from its eyes downward. The colors of their wings differ depending on the bird’s sex. Male kestrels have bluish-gray wings and females have brown wings. […]

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Woman holding Eastern Indigo Snake

Species Spotlight: The Eastern Indigo Snake

The eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon couperi) is the longest native snake in the United States. Adults are typically 60-84 inches (152-213 cm), but the longest eastern indigo reached 110.4 in. Male snakes grow longer than females. They are a shiny blueish-black color with some red or orange scales around their chins and sides of face. […]

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grasshopper sparrow

Species Spotlight: The Florida Grasshopper Sparrow

Donate The Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus) is a nonmigratory subspecies of the grassland sparrow and is found only on the dry prairies of south-central Florida. The song of the Florida grasshopper sparrow sounds much like that of a grasshopper, which is where it gets its name. Males only sing a few hours a […]

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bonneted bat

Species Spotlight: The Florida Bonneted Bat

The Florida bonneted bat, Eumops floridanus, is the largest insectivorous (insect-eating) bat in North America. It’s the United States’ rarest bat – fewer than 1,000 are believed to remain — and is known only from southern Florida.

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